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Recycling Information
The Importance of Recycling
The following descriptions can help you decide how best to recycle.
 Automotive

Includes: Motor oil, oil filters, antifreeze, and tires. Do not contaminate motor oil with water, antifreeze, brake fluid, engine cleaner, or fuel, etc.

 Cans

Includes: Aluminum cans, aerosol cans (empty and without pressure), foil, bi-metals, and metal food trays. Labels are OK. Clean only enough to prevent odors. NO scrap metal or appliances. NO cans with paint or hazardous waste.

 Cardboard & Chipboard

Includes: Corrugated cardboard, cereal or cracker boxes, shoe boxes, milk cartons, egg cartons, juice boxes, and frozen food boxes. Flatten clean, corrugated cardboard or chipboard. Break down and place in bundles no larger than 3'x 3' in size. Remove liners from cereal/cracker boxes.

 E-Waste: Batteries & Televisions

E-Waste consists of items containing Lead, Mercury, or Cadmium. For example: Televisions, Computer Monitors/Towers, and Batteries. Do not throw televisions and computer monitors in the garbage. They are banned from landfill disposal sites due to the lead contained in the glass screens. Check with your local garbage service to find out where to dispose of these items. Do not throw household batteries (including rechargeable and alkaline batteries) in the garbage. Separate them from other items and take them to the local hazardous waste collection facility. Always remember to remove batteries before discarding electronics.

 Glass

Includes: Bottles and jars (metal lids go with metal recyclables). Recycle only clean, unbroken materials. Colors may be mixed (unless otherwise indicated), and labels may still be attached. NO ceramics, tableware, Pyrex, windows, light bulbs, or mirrors.

 Magazines, Newspapers & Telephone Books

Includes: Soft cover books, catalogs and telephone books. Newspaper inserts OK, keep dry. NO rubber bands, plastic bags, product samples, water, dirt, mold, or contamination.

 Mixed Paper

Includes: Mixed office paper, white or colored envelopes, white or colored copy paper, computer paper, wrapping paper, shredded paper, brown "kraft" envelopes, and most junk mail that is not heavily glued or labeled. No paper tissues, paper towels, neon paper, waxed or laminated paper, foil-lined paper, etc. Do not include dirty or food-stained paper.

 Plastics

Includes: Plastic bottles, jugs, transparent cartons, and plastic bags.Plastics are labeled from #1 to #7; check with your local recycling service to see which numbers it accepts There is no need to remove labels or bands.

 Yard Debris

Includes: Grass clippings, branches, leaves, vegetable trimmings, and tree trunks (cut up, no stumps). NO rocks, dirt, or dog waste. Contact your local collection agency for more information.

Did you know that California law requires a waste diversion rate of 50 percent? That means recycling is very important; but there’s more to it than just recycling your bottles, cans, and newspapers.

Some materials such as motor oil, batteries, and household toxics are forbidden in the trash and must be taken to a local collection center for disposal. If these items are not disposed of properly, they can contaminate everything they come into contact with.

Please consult the table on the next page to find out what to do with your recyclables. You’ll feel good about helping the environment. For more information on recycling, call Yolo County Integrated Waste Management at 530 666-8852 www.yolocounty.org

Household Hazardous Waste (HHW)
Household Toxins

Many products found in your home are potentially hazardous substances. Because of their chemical nature, they can poison, corrode, explode, or ignite easily when handled improperly. It is illegal to dispose of household toxins in the trash, storm drains, or onto the ground. The following are examples of these products:

Adhesives Fuel (NO Containers) Oven Cleaners
Aerosol Sprays Fungicides Paint (all kinds)
Antifreeze Glues Paint Thinners
Auto Batteries Kitchen Cleaners Pesticides
Batteries Lighter Fluids Pool Chemicals
Cosmetics Medications Solvents
Drain Openers Nail Polish &
Polish Remover
Syringes
Engine Cleaners Weed Killers
Fluorescent Lamps Oil & Oil Filters Wood Finishes

How Do I Properly Manage Household Toxins?

Reduce by purchasing only the amount you need.
Reuse the products by donating unused portions to friends or community organizations.
Recycle leftover household toxins that are recyclable and dispose of the others safely.

What is CRV?

Beverage containers labeled CRV (California Refund Value) can be redeemed at
designated centers.

Non-CRV glass, metal, and plastic beverage containers are accepted for recycling at most drop-off recycling locations.

For more information about buyback for bottles and cans,
visit http://1800recycling.com, or call 1 800-RECYCLE (732-9253).

For more information on hazardous waste disposal, call CalRecycle at 916 322-4027, or contact your local collection agency.

RECHARGEABLE BATTERY RECYCLING CORPORATION (RBRC)

YOLO COUNTY AREA DROP-OFF SITES:
ace hardware 240 G St Davis 95616 530 758-8000
city of winters 318 1st St Los Gatos 95694 530 795-4910
home depot 1860 E Main St Woodland 95776 530 661-1201
radio shack 423 N Santa Cruz Av Davis 95616 530 758-0640
the radio guys 423 N Santa Cruz Av Woodland 95695 530 406-0700
www.call2recycle.org

The Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation (RBRC) is dedicated to recycling used rechargeable batteries and old cell phones. Sites collect Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd), Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH), Lithium Ion (Li- ion), and Small Sealed Lead *(Pb) rechargeable batteries. Rechargeable batteries are the power source for cordless power tools, cellular and cordless phones, laptop computers, and camcorders. If your batteries are alka- line or non-rechargeable, please contact your local Household Hazardous Waste office.


Some of the items listed above may not be accepted by all recycling agencies. To verify whether a particular recycling
agency accepts a specific item, please contact them directly at the phone numbers listed on the following page.

Curbside Collection & Drop-Off

For more information on recycling, call Yolo County Integrated Waste Management at 530 666-8852 www.yolocounty.org

DAVIS
Davis Waste Removal
2727 2nd St 95618530 756-4646
www.davisrecycling.org

Curbside Collection & Drop-Off Location Curbside Collection & Drop-Off Location Curbside Collection & Drop-Off Location Curbside Collection & Drop-Off Location Curbside Collection & Drop-Off Location Curbside Collection & Drop-Off Location Curbside Collection   Drop-Off Location CRV Available Also accepts scrap metal at drop-off location only.
UC Davis Waste Reduction & Recycling
Call530 752-7456
http://sustainability.ucdavis.edu

Curbside Collection & Drop-Off Location Curbside Collection & Drop-Off Location Curbside Collection & Drop-Off Location Curbside Collection & Drop-Off Location Curbside Collection & Drop-Off Location Curbside Collection & Drop-Off Location   Drop-Off Locatio   Services the UC Davis campus only. Drop-off sites located throughout the campus.

EL MACERO
Davis Waste Removal
Call530 756-4646
www.dwrco.com

Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection      

ESPARTO
Esparto Convenience Center
27075 County Rd 19 A
95627530 787-3387
www.yolocounty.org

Drop-off
Location
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Drop-off
Location (Fee Charged)
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Drop-Off Location *Accepts household batteries only.

WINTERS
Waste Management
Call530 795-1201
www.sacramentovalley.wm.com

Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection

Curbside Collection

Curbside Collection      

WOODLAND
Waste Management
Call530 662-8748
www.sacramentovalley.wm.com

Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection   Curbside Collection (Call for container)  
J&M Recycling
1310 E Beamer St
95695530 662-8253
www.jandmrecycling.com

Drop-off
Location
Drop-off
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Drop-off
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  CRV Available Also Accepts scrap metal
Yolo Employment Services
660 6th St
Woodland 95695530 662-8616

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  Drop-off
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Drop-off
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      CRV Available

YOLO COUNTY
Yolo County Central Landfill
44090 County Rd 28H
Woodland 95776530 666-8729
www.yolocounty.org

Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Curbside Collection Drop-off
Location
Drop-Off Location Also accepts household hazardous waste. Call for more info.

Appliance Recycling
Jaco Environmental 877 577-0510
PG&E Customers 800 299-7573
www.appliancerecycling.com

Free curbside large appliance pick-up and utility company rebate. Not available in all areas.
Please inquire with your local utility company for more details.
* Recyclable plastic items are marked with a numbered triangle that specifies their category.
† Also provides service for western Santa Clara County including unincorporated areas.

Composting

Closely considered the 4th “R” of recycling, compost (or rot) is nature’s method of recycling. It is a managed decomposition of organic material such as yard trimmings and food scraps. This can be done at a home site or commercially at a facility. By developing a compost pile at home, a large percentage of your waste will never reach the landfill. Instead, composting turns your waste into a rich, quality organic matter that can be used to strengthen and protect your soil, flower beds, and gardens.

Starting a Compost Pile

Establishing a compost pile in your backyard all begins with a bin or an open pile. Bins can be made using scraps of wood, chicken wire, snow fencing, or old garbage cans. Manufactured bins can be purchased at local hardware or home improvement stores. They are available in many different styles based on their method of turning. These include hoops, cones, and stacking bins. Prices and sizes vary so take the time to consider which options best suite your needs.

Some cities and states have established guidelines as to how to set up a bin and what type is required for your area. Contact your city or county government for information about free composting workshops or even discounted or free composting bins. Or if you prefer to build your own, instructions can be found at CalRecycle’s website:
www.calrecycle.ca.gov.


What Is Included

For a compost pile to be effective, the right conditions must be established for the development of organisms, fungus, bacteria, and insects. The right combinations of these are required to properly breakdown the material. Developing these combinations is a lot like following a recipe. The easiest recipe for composting is equal amounts of green or wet materials (high in nitrogen) and brown or dry materials (high in carbon).

Ingredients

Nitrogen:
This chemical element is produced when green (wet) materials such as lawn clippings, landscape trimmings, fruits, and vegetables are included. The presence of pests and odors can be controlled by avoiding the inclusion of meat or dairy scraps and burying any food scraps deep within the pile.

Carbon:
This chemical element is produced when brown (dry) yard and garden material such as dry leaves, branches, straw, wood chips, and sawdust are included. Large pieces need to be chopped or broken down to 12 inches or shorter.

Water:
Maintaining a continual presence of water and moisture will keep the composting process active. If the pile is too dry or too wet composting will stop. Proper moisture levels should be equal to a 40-60%. You can check your compost pile for the right amount of water by grabbing a handful of the pile and squeezing it. A few drops of water should drop from the material when you squeeze. Be sure and grab from the middle of the pile so you are not just measuring the moisture on the top. During warmer months, water will need to be applied frequently and during excessively rainy and colder months the

pile may need to be covered to keep it from becoming too wet. A properly constructed pile will drain off excess water and prevent it from becoming soggy.

Air:
Just like other organisms, bacteria and fungus need oxygen to live. Therefore, a steady rotation of the pile is required to ensure air is dispersed throughout the pile. Without the proper air, the pile will become too wet and cause the organisms to die. Decomposition will slow down and the pile will emit an unpleasant odor. A pitchfork can be used to rotate or “fluff” the pile or some manufactured bins include an automatic turn feature. Turning an existing pile can be as easy as re-piling it into a new pile.

An equally balanced amount of each material is required for your compost pile to remain active and odor free. Levels can be maintained by including an even amount of both green and brown compost each time more ingredients are added.

Ideal Compost

Along with the items listed above, the following compost is ideal to include:

  • Eggshells
  • Fruit and vegetable remains
  • Cardboard
  • Coffee grounds and tea leaves
  • Nut shells
  • Shredded newspaper
  • Houseplants
  • Animal manure

Compost to Avoid

The following compost should not be included as they release harmful substances, cause odors, attract unwanted pests, or contain parasites harmful to humans.

  • Coal or charcoal
  • Dairy products
  • Diseased plants
  • Meat or fish scraps
  • Fats, grease, or oils
  • Pet waste
  • Chemically treated yard trimmings

NOTE: Many of the above items including those you should avoid can be included in city or county green waste compost bins. Oftentimes, any food scraps, food soiled paper, plants, and other materials are accepted. Please check with your city and county government to a list of what can be included in green compost bins.

When Composting is Done

Composting promotes the development of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) which break down organic matter, creating humus. Humus is a nutritionally rich substance that spreads nutrients to the soil and helps it retain moisture. Your compost pile becomes humus when it turns into a uniform, crumbly product that has a pleasant, earthy aroma and is dark brown in color. Some larger chunks may remain which can then be screened out and tossed or included in a new compost pile.

The ideal size of a compost pile is one cubic yard (three feet tall by three feet wide by three feet deep). Stop adding to the pile once it reaches this size.

For local composting information
please contact:

Davis Recycling Program
Call530 757-5686
www.davisrecycling.org

Yolo County Master Gardener
Program
70 Cottonwood St
Woodland 95695 530 666-8737
mgyolo@ucdavis.edu
http://ceyolo.ucdavis.edu

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